<div dir="ltr"><ul style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"><span class=""><font color="#888888">*Seeking 2 new PhD students for the Hydroecology Science and Engineering<br>Lab at Colorado State University, starting Fall 2014*<br>
<br>Contact Dr. Michael Gooseff (<a href="mailto:mgooseff@engr.colostate.edu" target="_blank">mgooseff@engr.colostate.edu</a>) for additional<br>detail.<br>Lab web page at:<a href="http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~mgooseff/" target="_blank">http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~mgooseff/</a><br>
<br><br>*System Responses to Permafrost Degradation* - In the past several years,<br>several researchers have discovered permafrost degradation features in the<br>McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The most abundant features found are on<br>
the margins of stream channels, which are directly influencing stream<br>chemistry and sediment load. We seek a student who will focus on the<br>changes to stream (and possibly lake) systems in response to permafrost<br>degradation around streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The<br>
student will be expected to deploy to Antarctica and spend extensive time<br>working both independently and cooperatively as part of an<br>interdisciplinary research team to conduct research on the function of this<br>ecosystem.<br>
<br>*How Does Stream-Watershed Connectivity Influence Ecosystem Function and<br>Water Quality?* - The connectivity of stream networks to watersheds varies<br>across spatial and temporal scales, yet fundamentally controls water and<br>
solute fluxes to stream networks. We seek a student to focus on the water<br>quality and stream ecosystem responses to seasonal, annual, and<br>anthropogenically induced changes in hydrologic and chemical connectivity<br>
across several watersheds in Colorado.<br><br>*Our Lab*: Our research group (and the broader programs at CSU) is a<br>friendly, respectful, and collaborative environment in which students work<br>with each other and Dr. Gooseff to solve problems and advance ideas. Most<br>
of Dr. Gooseff&#39;s graduate students conduct some level of field data<br>collection or experimentation prior to conducting numerical modeling or<br>analysis studies to make progress on determining how natural systems<br>
function or might respond to specific perturbations.<br><br><br>*Successful applicants* for these opportunities will have:<br><br> -- a strong motivation and deep curiosity,<br><br> -- a solid quantitative background,<br>
<br> -- ability to work with MATLAB, R, and/or GIS,<br><br> -- ability to conduct field work in harsh, sometimes demanding<br>conditions, and<br><br> ---- strong communication and interpersonal skills.<br><br>Opportunities exist for the applicants to work with Dr. Gooseff through the<br>
graduate program in the Department of Civil &amp; Environmental<br>Engineering&lt;<a href="http://www.engr.colostate.edu/ce/graduate.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.engr.colostate.edu/ce/graduate.shtml</a>&gt;,<br>the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology<br>
&lt;<a href="http://ecology.colostate.edu/" target="_blank">http://ecology.colostate.edu/</a>&gt;(GDPE), and/or the I-WATER<br>IGERT &lt;<a href="http://i-water.colostate.edu/" target="_blank">http://i-water.colostate.edu/</a>&gt; program at Colorado State University.<span class=""><font color="#888888"><br>
<br><br>--<br>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++<br>Michael Gooseff -- Associate Professor<br>Dept. of Civil &amp; Environmental Engineering<br>Colorado State University<br>Fort Collins, CO 80525<br><br>email:<a href="mailto:mgooseff@engr.colostate.edu" target="_blank">mgooseff@engr.colostate.edu</a><br>
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++<br></font></span></font></span></ul><font color="#888888"></font><br>
</div>